Spinal Cord Injuries and the Feldenkrais Method of Movement Education

Spinal Cord Injuries and the Feldenkrais Method of Movement Education

Cindy Allison, a University of Canterbury, (UC) PhD student, is carrying out the world’s first research on spinal cord injuries using the Feldenkrais Method to provide people the chance to recover movement and stability.

In the 1940s, Israeli physicist, Dr Moshe Feldenkrais, combined his knowledge of martial arts, biomechanics, neurophysiology, anatomy, learning theory, child development, systems theory, physics and psychology to develop the Feldenkrais Method, a form of sensory motor education.

Research has provided evidence of benefits including reduced pain, fatigue, stress and medicalcosts; and improved mobility, stability, coordination and breathing. However there has been no research done with spinal cord injury.

Cindy was drawn to the Feldenkrais Method because of her own pain and loss of movement and sensation. For her PhD she is developing the first Feldenkrais program in the world for people with spinal cord injury.

Rather than isolating muscles and working hard in an attempt to restore movement, Feldenkrais encourages expanding body awareness, and paying attention to the quality of movement and the effect that the movement has on  the coordination of the whole body.

You stay within your comfort zone; it is process oriented and fun. The focus is also on learning how to learn. Clients grow to understand biomechanics and learning principles, they are eventually able to improve their movement independently of the practitioner.

“I was so impressed with the method that I began researching its potential for people with spinal cord injury. Some of the world’s top neuroscientists advocate the method. I have people around the world with spinal cord injury discovering significant
improvement using Feldenkrais principles despite negative prognoses.’’

Kevin Hitchcock, a former director of news and Channel Ten in Sydney was told he would be paralyzed from the neck down for the rest of his life, she said.

He has made an almost full recovery and written a book after improving via the Feldenkrais Method.

American Molly Hale, subject of a documentary film, broke her neck in 1995 and was told that she would be paralyzed from the shoulders down. Hale has made significant progress. In recent months she has walked unassisted for the first time since her accident.

Germany’s Irene Lober was able to ditch her wheelchair, ski, and climb hills despite being told she would need a wheelchair for the rest of her life. She documented her recovery in her Master’s thesis and then went on to train as a Feldenkrais practitioner.

Australian triathlete, Michael Forbes, describes on YouTube how he learned to walk again using Feldenkrais. More examples are on Allison’s website www.neuroplasticity.co.nz.

I suspect many more stories that haven’t been documented. Recovery is a gradual process but my clients have reported a number of benefits including reduced pain and spasm; and improved coordination and ease of movement, posture and breathing.

“Clients who had no sensation below their break are reporting that sensation and
movement are returning. I want to develop group programs that are accessible
and affordable for disabled people.’’

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If you know anyone with paralysis from stroke, head injury, spinal cord injury or multiple sclerosis, please have them contact us concerning Feldenkrais Private Sessions and Classes. Visit our website for information about Feldenkrais and Carol Siddiqi, Feldenkrais Practitioner.

 

 

The Incredible Value of Play for Adults!

Carol was bored on her daily one-hour walks, so she inventeda game to entertain herself. In the next two blocks she would take exactly 300 steps. Walking as “normally” as possible; first day – needed 25 mini steps, second day – needed 10  giant steps, third day-tried zig-zags and only needed 10 mini steps (zig-zags were fun), and so on.

Little did she know that as she was playing she was also improving her mind; improving the way her brain and body handled space, time, design, and even stress.  So, later she was surprised when she was able to avoid a car which had suddenly swerved into her lane by almost effortlessly maneuvering her car, going off the road safely and well.

Play can be lifesaving which is why the military teaches its officers how to improve their ability to play. Einstein riding on a trolley, pretended (played) to ride a light beam as he was watching the town hall clock which enabled him to get the insight he needed to discover that e = mc sq. Miles Davis played with the notes to find the “real” music.

Play helps us deal with our ordeals, and lighten the stress and loads of our lives. Play opens up and heightens our short-term memory and can even help us use our dreams to solve problems, especially creative problems.

Play can help us to use all our talents and skills better, and even lower pain levels and help us heal faster. Play can bring incredible insights into the way you and others function in daily life.

Many people have discovered that a family that plays together is creating a structure and trust that helps when problems arise. The same trust issues can be developed by play in business, which is why those golf and other outings are important and worth the time and money.

There is a funny paradox:  play can improve us without our knowing it. Useful play is a skill that can be improved. You too can learn how to use play more effectively which is why I have joined with Jungian and play expert, Dr. Mary Alice Long, to create the workshop: “Know Thy Self and Play for Success.”

Join us for four days of playful transformation. For more information see our flyer.  Learn how to play with your problems and stress and turn them into the game pieces of success, as you also improve your
creativity and leadership abilities (including parenting).  Besides, we are going to be playing and we’re going to have fun!

By Betsy Wetzig, Originator of Coordination Pattern™ “Breakthru” Training

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