Massage for Arthritis

massage-300x200by Jeanne Mancinelli, RN, LMT

Massage is often used to relieve common symptoms of arthritis by helping to reduce pain and stiffness, easing anxiety, improving range of motion in joints, and helping to promote restful sleep. People who experience the chronic symptoms of arthritis may consider using massage therapy regularly and even daily self-massage to help manage the joint pain and stiffness or help promote better sleep.

Massage is an ancient form of pain and stress relief that usually involves physical manipulation of the muscles as well as relaxation techniques. Swedish massage, the most common type of massage utilized for this, involves long fluid stroking of muscles and tissues to reduce soreness and stiffness in muscles and joints, reduce anxiety, and improve circulation. The therapist may utilize heat and cold applications to the muscles and joints. Certain essential oils may also be employed to relax the muscles or ease joint pain.

Be sure to tell your massage therapist that you have arthritis and point out the affected joints prior to the start of the session.  During the massage, the therapist should check in frequently with you to determine if the pressure is within your comfort range. If it is not, be sure to tell  them immediately.

Performing self massage can help manage muscle and joint pain between massage sessions. If done daily, you may be able to lengthen the time between massage sessions. Inform your therapist if you are interested in learning self massage. It is not difficult to learn and can be incorporated in your appointment. Before getting any type of massage, it is always best to consult your physician if massage is safe for your arthritis or any other health conditions you may have.

Call Jeanne Mancinelli today at 610-393-9676 for you FREE consultation!!!

Too Busy to Relax?

massage-300x200by Jeanne Mancinelli, RN, LMT

Busy-ness is the trend these days. People carry over-packed schedules like winning trophies. I’m SO busy at work! How do you have time to do that? I’m too busy to read/watch TV/exercise/do anything fun. I can’t get monthly massages I have too much to DO!

Too much “busy” could be making you tired, sick, and probably cranky.

When do you relax? RELAX. “Relaxation” is a word we hear often, but don’t know always know what it means. Here, I’ve compiled some options for you.

re·lax  verb \ri-ˈlaks\

1: the state of being free from tension or anxiety.

2: a way to rest and enjoy yourself

3: recreation or rest, especially after a period of work.

4: the loss of tension in a part of the body, especially in a muscle when it ceases to contract.

5: something that you do to stop feeling nervous, worried, etc.

More importantly, what does relaxation mean to you? 

If you’re not a “hot bath and good book” kind of person, you probably cringe at Calgon commercials and spa photos of people with stones piled on their backs. But here’s the beauty: You can make your own definition of relaxation.

It’s your job to figure out what you enjoy doing, what makes you smile, and what makes you feel like you are a hundred miles from work or home jobs?

Then, make time for that. 

You have a schedule. Write in special time for a hobby, a nap, massage, your favorite show, a weekend getaway, a new class, ANY thing you enjoy can be relaxing.

Need someone to give you a reason? Want permission?

August 15 is National Day of Relaxation. Yes, it’s a thing! And it’s just begging for celebration.

Here are some ideas:

  • Spend part of the day alone.
  • Spend part of the day with your family, doing ONLY fun stuff.
  • Meditate
  • Devote time to your hobby.
  • Sleep in. Or get up extra early. Whichever excites you!
  • Arrange for take-out or pre-cooked meals all day.
  • Schedule a massage! (My personal favorite.)

Call Jeanne Mancinelli LMT to schedule 610-393-9676.

If you’ve always wanted a day to “not leave the house” today’s the day! Wake when you wish, eat when you’re hungry, stay in your jammies and read a book.

Taking care of you is important. And, self-care puts you in a better frame of mind to take care of the people who depend on you. So find the thing that mellows you out, and make it happen!


Healing with Daily Food – Daikon Radish

macrobiotic-diet-chartby Stephen Hoog

The daikon radish is a long white root vegetable sometimes up to a foot in length. It can be boiled, steamed, sauteed or pickled. It has pungent taste when raw and sweet taste when cooked. One of its main actions is to disperse animal fats that may have accumulated in and around organs  When one eats a meal high in oil or fat it is beneficial to fine grate a daikon then add a few drops of good quality soy sauce or tamari. By eating this simple dish as a condiment the meal is more easily digested. Daikon radish, also, can be obtained in the dried form. Soaked and eaten as a vegetable this form can help dissolve fatty deposits deep in the body such as those found in the prostate ovaries or uterus. Fresh daikon is more helpful in dissolving fats in more superficial parts of the body but can have a general effect.

There are special radish drinks which can be used for other medicinal purposes . One for fever is called Daikon Drink #1.  It is made by mixing 3 tbsps. grated radish, 1/4 tsp grated ginger and 2tsps. soy sauce. Then one pours 2-3 cups hot kukicha tea [twig tea] over it. It should be drunk warm–as much as possible. Then one should wrap oneself in a warm blanket or go to sleep. It makes you sweat and lowers body temperature. Some have used it for animal food poisoning and appendicitis. It is best used by strong and active people who get a fever from extreme foods. It shouldn’t be taken more than 3x a day.

Daikon Drink #2 is used to induce urination to relieve swollen feet or ankles. It is prepared by grating a 1/2 cup of radish and squeezing out the juice. Next one takes 2 tbsp of juice and adds 6 tbsp of hot water with a small amount of soy sauce or sea salt. This mix is brought to a boil and simmered for 1 minute, then drunk.   It should be used only  once a day and no more than three days in a row.

There is also a special carrot-daikon drink which helpful for liver problems and aids in discharging eggs, cheese and animal fats from almost any where in the body . It can dissolve calcified stones in the gall bladder and kidneys. It is being used for dissolving tumors and numerous other conditions.  It is made by grating 1/2 cup each of carrots and daikon. This is put in a pan with 2 cups of water and brought to a slow boil. Then  1/3 sheet of nori seaweed and 1/3 of an umeboshi plum should be added.  All ingredients are cooked for 3 minutes  with a few drops of soy sauce included  at the end. Everything then is eaten.

Numerous other daikon drinks can be prepared for varying conditions. Adding foods like shiitake mushrooms, lotus root, cabbage, burdock,  or roasted rice to the drink can target a variety of organs and conditions.

Daikon leaves are not to be wasted, They are very valuable, They can be eaten as a vegetable, pickled, made into a tea or used as a compress[for allergies].  Daikon leaves can be boiled and made into a hip bath for warming the lower abdominal area which loosens stagnation in that area. Cysts and tumors are helped by this.

Daikon roots are pickled at old farmhouses by hanging the root up to dry for a few days until they are limp then placing in a crock. They are mixed with rice bran and salt and layered. The following year they  are removed.  These pickles are high in vitamins and minerals and digestives enzymes. They can be eaten one small slice at a time usually during the colder months.

Some local food stores carry daikon  all year.  Chinese stores often carry it.  Locally grown is usually available in the fall . It is not always easy to grow the early varieties as they get buggy easily. Some farmers actually use daikon to loosen the soil so when they harvest it in the fall there is often an abundance of daikon available at farmers markets.

The list of use for the daikon is much longer than this article can cover..It is a fascinating common food that has marvelous healing properties and it needs no prescription to obtain.

The Macrobiotic Way of Eating involves assessing how one is making balance, both internally and in relationship to the environment then making choices to maintain that balance.  It also involves seeing the situation in terms of energy. A formal consultation includes looking at a persons medical history, using oriental diagnosis such as facial clues and   pulse reading, discussion of emotional factors and finally muscle testing to clarify what a persons individual needs are.  In most cases the result is a recommendation for a plant based diet however some animal may be included if a person so desires as well as herbal supplements if needed. This way of eating is changing constantly  throughout the seasons and as ones’ condition improves.

Read about Stephen Hoog and Macrobiotic Way of Eating.